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Indian Quaterly (IQ) magazine has published a very interesting article on short story writer Saadat Hasan Manto’s neighbourhoods in Mumbai. Photographer Ram Rahman has taken some outstanding pictures of the various haunts that appear in Manto’s stories and areas where he lived.

Manto’s  Bombay was a cosmopolitan and relatively integrated city in which Hindus, Muslims, Sikhs, Christians and Jews all lived in harmony until the communal violence that erupted in the approach to Independence. In his stories about that period you encounter both generous humanity and the most bestial, inhumane acts, sometimes involving the same person.You will also come across names of streets like Farris Road, Claire Road, Byculla station, Sarvi Restaurant etc in many of his stories. Given below is a photo gallery shot by Ram Rehman. You can read the entire article here: http://indianquarterly.com/walking-mantos-bombay/

Manto lived in Adelphi Chambers–the building on the right

Manto lived in Adelphi Chambers–the building on the right

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sex workers waiting for customers off Falkland road

Sex workers waiting for customers off Falkland road

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Mariam building in Byculla was at the heart of Manto’s neighbourhood. In the late 1940’s the area was still largely Jewish

The Mariam building in Byculla was at the heart of Manto’s neighbourhood. In the late 1940’s the area was still largely Jewish

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Manto worked at The Filmistan studio in Goregaon with the star Ashok Kumar.

Manto worked at The Filmistan studio in Goregaon with the star Ashok Kumar.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Sarvi restaurant, a Manto hang-out, is still renowned for its Persian- style kebabs

The Sarvi restaurant, a Manto hang-out, is still renowned for its Persian- style kebabs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Journalist Rafique Baghdadi, a connosieur of  Bombay guided Ram Rahman through the nooks and corners of the city to discover Manto’s Bombay.

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