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220px-GumrahHere is one of Sahir Ludhinavi’s best works – Khubsoorat Mod. The poem appeared as a song in the film Gumrah, released in 1963, directed by B.R. Chopra.
The song was sung by Mahendra Kapoor and picturised on Sunil Dutt. The film’s music was composed by Ravi.

Below are the lyrics of the song in Romanised Urdu:

Chalo ik baar phir say ajnabi bun jaaiN hum dono

Na main tum say koi umeed rakhooN dil navazi ki
Na tum meri taraf daikho ghalat andaaz nazroN say
Na meray dil ki dhaRkan laRkhaRa’ay meri baatoN say
Na zahir ho tumhari kashmakash ka raaz nazroN say

TumhaiN bhi koi uljhan rokti hai paish qadmi say
Mujhay bhi log kehtay haiN, yeh jalvay paraa’ay haiN
Meray humraah bhi rusvaaiyaaN haiN meray maazi ki
Tumharay saath bhi guzri hui raatoN kay saa’ay haiN

Ta’aruf rog ho ja’ay to iska bholna behtar
Ta’aluq bojh bun ja’ay to iska toRna achha
Wo afsaanay jissay anjam tak laana na-mumkin
Issay ik khoobsurat moR day ker choRna achha

Chalo ik baar phir say ajnabi bun jaaiN hum dono

The English translation by Khwaja Tariq Mahmood, in the book “Poems of Sahir Ludhinavi” is below:

Come, let the two of us become strangers once again
Not that I should entertain a hope for your kindred aptitude
Not that you should look at me with an inviting attitude
Not that my heart exudes excitement by my platitude
Not that your eyes betray, and upon your secrets they intrude

May be you have misgivings in the way of your exuberance
People also tell me that the signals are of no significance
My past misdemeanours with me are a cause for disturbance
You are also living in the shadow of your acquiescence

If acquaintanceship becomes trouble some, then better to forget
If friendship becomes burdensome, then better pay the dest
A tale which cannot culminate to its natural set
‘Tis better to terminate it, without any regret

Come, let the two of us become strangers once again

The poem in Urdu script is below – Picture1

Below is a clip of the song from the film, Gumrah.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wzbO1mjFPOM

Here is also a very interesting comparison made between Sahir Ludhianvi and Michael Drayton, sourced from this blog: http://sheetalvyas.blogspot.in/2005/07/agreement.html

Since there’s no help, come let us kiss and part,
Nay, I have done: you get no more of me,
And I am glad, yea glad with all my heart,
That thus so cleanly I myself can free.
Shake hands for ever, cancel all our vows,
And when we meet at any time again
Be it not seen in either of our brows
That we one jot of former love retain.
-Michael Drayton

chalo ik baar phir se ajnabi ban jaaen ham dono
na main tumse koi ummeed rakhun dilnavaazi ki
na tum meri taraf dekho galat andaaz nazaron se
na mere dil ki dhadkan ladkhadaaye meri baaton se
na zaahir ho tumhaari kashmkash ka raaz nazaron se…
chalo ik baar phir se ajnabi ban jaaen ham dono
-Sahir Ludhianvi

And also from http://readerswords.wordpress.com/2005/08/28/sahirs-khoobsoot-mod/  – as below
It is very uncanny that ‘Khoobsoorat Mod’- a nazm that is so unique in Urdu poetry should be so similar to an English poem ‘The Parting‘ by a 17th century English poet. Thematically and even idiomatically they are almost identical and the more one reads ‘The Parting’, the more convincingly it seems to have been transcreated by Sahir
See, for example the similarity betwen the following stanzas:
(A) Shake hands for ever, cancel all our vows,
(B) And when we meet at any time again,
(C) Be it not seen in either of our brows
(D) That we one jot of former love retain.
(a) na mai.n tumase koI ummiid rakhuu.n dilanavaazii kii
(b) na tum merii taraf dekho galat a.ndaaz nazaro.n se
(c) na mere dil kii dha.Dakan la.Dakha.Daaye merii baato.n se
(d) na zaahir ho tumhaarii kashm-kash kaa raaz nazaro.n se
Notice the similaries betwen (A) and (a) and the ‘Be it not seen in wither of our brows’ in (b), (c) and (d). Though the two poems seem to go in different directions subsequently:

Now at the last gasp of Love’s latest breath,
When, his pulse failing, Passion speechless lies,
When Faith is kneeling by his bed of death,
And innocence is closing up his eyes,
Now if thou wouldst, when all have given him over,
From death to life thou might’st him yet recover.
taarruf rog ho jaaye to usako bhuulanaa behatar
taalluk bojh ban jaaye to usako to.Danaa achchhaa
vo afasaanaa jise a.njaam tak laanaa naa ho mumakin – 2
use ek khuubasuurat mo.D dekar chho.Danaa achchhaa
chalo ik baar phir se …

While Sahir speaks of this as a ‘rog’ and gives a twist in a different direction taking the parting to its culimination, I am not sure if Drayton also means the same thing and indicates a ‘return’ when he says:

Now if thou wouldst, when all have given him over,
From death to life thou might’st him yet recover.

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